An Interview with Edward Hopper, June 17, 1959

Intermission, 1963 “I believe that the great painters with their intellect as master have attempted to force this unwilling medium of paint and canvas into a record of their emotions.”   Interview with Edward Hopper, Conducted by John Morse, June 17, 1959 The following oral history transcript is the result of a tape-recorded interview with […]

Lisette Model: “A History of Street Photography” (2001)

Model saw her subjects as misshapen, almost beastly.   By Joel Meyerowitz and Colin Westerbeck, text excerpt from Bystander: A History of Street Photography, 2001 Another refugee who had to stoop to hustling, scrambling, and scraping by, and ultimately to street photography to support herself, was Lisette Model. Although she came from Vienna, Model had […]

William Eggleston: Introduction to ‘Ancient and Modern’ (1992)

“In the late Sixties Eggleston turned to the use of color transparency film and photographed prolifically. William Eggleston: Introduction to Ancient and Modern By Mark Holborn William Eggleston was driving with the writer Stanley Booth from Georgia to Tennessee. It was 1978 and Eggleston had acquired an early Kodak instant camera. He started to photograph […]

Bill Brandt: A Statement on Photography (1948)

“I am not interested in rules and conventions … photography is not a sport. If I think a picture will look better brilliantly lit, I use lights, or even flash.”   By Bill Brandt, First published in Camera in London, 1948 I had the good fortune to start my career in Paris in 1929. For […]

Richard Avedon – ‘Jacob Israel Avedon’ (1974)

Jacob Israel Avedon, father of Richard Avedon, Sarasota, Florida, 1969-1973 We all perform. It’s what we do for each other all the time, deliberately or unintentionally.   By Richard Avedon, July 14, 1974, New York City, Originally Published in Camera Magazine, November, 1974 A photographic portrait is a picture of someone who knows he’s being photographed, […]

A Conversation Between Lewis Baltz and John Gossage (2010)

“For me the word ‘photographer’ talks about the means of delivering certain kinds of information, feelings and such. If you’re consistently focused on the means of delivery, it means you’re not getting the message across very clearly.” – John Gossage   Interview by Monte Packham Lewis Baltz and John Gossage depict man’s contentious impact on […]

The Garry Winogrand Problem (1988)

Shooting inordinate amounts of film, Winogrand charted a vast, freebooting odyssey through three-and-a-half decades of American culture.     Garry Winogrand: . . . ‘I forgot what year when Robert Frank’s book came out. He was working pretty much around that time, ’55 or whenever it was. And there were photographs in there, particularly that […]

The Photographer in the Beat-Hipster Idiom – Robert Frank’s The Americans

from ‘The Americans’ @ Robert Frank   Frank’s personality, described by Joyce Johnson as a blend of “European dourness and pessimistic wit,” certainly helped to focus his photographic vision.   By George Cotkin, Professor, Postwar United States Intellectual and Cultural History, California Polytechnic State University Few analysts have captured the sadness, tensions, ironies and possibilities […]

Richard Avedon’s ‘In the American West’

For Avedon’s program is supraindividual. He wants to portray the whole American West as a blighted culture that spews out casualties by the bucket: misfits, drifters, degenerates, crackups, and prisoners-entrapped, either literally or by debasing work. Richard Avedon’s “In the American West” By Max Kozloff “Sometimes I think all my pictures are just pictures of […]

Geoff Dyer on Trent Parke (2008)

Photography is a generous, abundant medium and Parke is a voracious photographer.   By Geoff Dyer I was introduced to the work of Trent Parke (born in Australia in 1971, a member of Magnum since 2007) by a mutual friend, the photographer, Matt Stuart. He showed me two books by Parke, both self-published. The first […]

‘Tulsa’ – An Essay by Larry Clark (1971)

“When I was 16 I started shooting valo. Valo was a nasel inhaler you could buy at the drugstore for a dollar with a tremendous amount of amphetamine in it.” Larry Clark, April, 1971 I was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma in January 1943. When I was 16 I started shooting valo. Valo was a nasel […]

Ralph Eugene Meatyard, 1925 – 1972

While he lived Meatyard’s work was shown and collected by major museums, published in important art magazines, and regarded by his peers as among the most original and disturbing imagery ever created with a camera. By James Rhem, 1999 Ralph Eugene Meatyard’s death in 1972, a week away from his 47th birthday, came at the […]