JM Ramirez-Suassi – Malparaíso

    There has been a much-needed turn away from the constraints of documentary photography over the past couple of years in favor of something less direct and more lyrical. I can think of several fantastic artists working away from the documentary with a tendency toward erasing its constrictive need for relational dialog. Federico Clavarino, […]

Interview with Sharr White

Photographer Larry Sultan’s iconic photobook Pictures from Home, initially published in 1992, found renewed acclaim with its 2017 re-release by MACK. Sultan’s intimate exploration of familial bonds captured the attention of audiences worldwide, culminating in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1989. The impact of Sultan’s photographic series resonated […]

Joel Pulliam on Ikko Narahara

Ikko Narahara – Where Time has Vanished by Joel Pulliam It has been on my mind for a while to write about something that I am provisionally calling “New Orientalism.” It is the phenomenon of highly regarded photographers dropping into Tokyo for a few weeks or months, taking pictures, and then publishing a book. I […]

Raymond Meeks & George Weld – The Inhabitants

  Putting my thoughts on this book together has taken me a while. Most of this comes down to trying to understand how I feel about the subject or lack of subject within the work and the position of the author(s) to that. I often have a knee-jerk reaction when it comes to people photographing […]

Mark Steinmetz – France 1987

I’m still determining who needs to hear this, but Mark Steinmetz remains one of the most profound voices in the rising tide of what I suggest is a revisiting of humanism in photography. Given the clamor and tumult of the past years, it is not a surprise that work like Mark’s, which, at its base, […]

Bertien van Manen – Gluckauf

Coal mining is a very peculiar enterprise. The 19th and 20th Centuries committed untold heaves of labor to its extraction. It fuels communities, yet its extraction suggests a disemboweling of the land where these communities settle. The prospect of coal mining is one of capital and capitalism. The very human clay that mines these enterprises […]

Laurenz Berges – Das Becherhaus in Mudersbach

  Full Article on Patreon     …Further images within images add to the sense of a lived space as Becher family photos from the 20s and 30s adorn mantels and countertops, with a finesse of an image, ala the Bechers, of a water town, sat, out of frame, lithely resting against a presumed wedding […]

Tomatsu Shomei <11:02> Nagasaki An Overview

  Full Article on Patreon   …11:02 Nagasaki contains elements of documentary practice mixed with an emotional and highly subjective style of photography. In essence, the book is caught, like Kawada’s Chizu, between two schools of thought regarding photography. On the one hand, there is a legacy of photography that considers politics and a (at […]

Nobuyoshi Araki The Banquet (Shokuji)

  Full Article on Patreon   “The Banquet is a different affair built around the same context of mourning. Instead of pictures of himself or his deceased wife, Araki presents a catalog of their last meals together. The images are shot with a close-up ring flash and a short lens to give a microphotographic feel […]

Alec Soth Sleeping By the Mississippi A 2022 Reaction

  The original source material from this post comes from a long-format discussion with many different voices penning their thoughts on Instagram. I wanted to discover what people thought of Alec Soth’s Sleeping by the Mississippi in 2022. Of course, this is culled from the people who follow me on Instagram and are interested in […]

Bernhard Fuchs Autos: A Forensic Realism, A Forensic Melancholy

The Full article can be found on Patreon   “The sadness that overwhelms us, the retardation that paralyzes us, are also a shield—sometimes the last one—against madness” ― Julia Kristeva, Black Sun: Depression and Melancholia   “On my bicycle tours, time and again, I saw passenger cars, buses, and trucks that just stood around. I […]

Seiichi Furuya FIRST TRIP TO BOLOGNA 1978 / LAST TRIP TO VENICE 1985

Christine Gössler exists in my mind, or rather the photographs of her, as the eternal notion of elegy in the photographic medium. Whereas she does not haunt my own memories, I feel the burden and the weight of her portraits through the images shot and books made by her husband Seiichi Furuya. When I suggest […]