Lee Friedlander: “The American Monument” (1976)

Vince Aletti describes The American Monument as “almost maniacally inclusive, rounding up everything from Plymouth Rock to a plaque commemorating the Pony Express in Salt Lake City and treating them with the same nonchalance. The doggedness of Friedlander’s quest is at once astounding and hilarious… History stalks the landscape at every turn.” The American Monument. […]

CAROL JERREMS: “PHOTOGRAPHS”

Carol Jerrems was an Australian photographer. Jerrems studied photography at Prahran College 1967-70. She is mainly known for documenting the counter-culture spirit of Melbourne in the 1970s. (Images @ National Gallery of Australia and Ken Jerrems and the Estate of Lance Jerrems)

Robert D’Allesandro: “Glory”

    “‘Glory’, the title of D’Alessandro’s 1973 book of photographs, is as understated and as charged as his pictures, each of which includes an American flag. Still timely more than three decades later, twenty-five of those pointedly black and white images remind us that, where the stars and stripes are concerned, ambivalence, irreverence and […]

Dan Weiner: “Photographs”

Born in New York City, Dan Weiner studied painting at the Art Students League in 1937 and at Pratt Institute from 1939 to 1940. As a member of the Photo League from 1935 to 1947, Weiner aimed to use photography to effect social change. Weiner also worked as a commercial photographer for Fortune Magazine.   […]

David Campany’s ‘Gasoline’ and the American Temple

It embodies Campany’s belief, “that photographs don’t have meanings: they have potential for meaning. It’s a question of how they’re used.” Or rather how we decide to see them. THE AMERICAN TEMPLE By Vladimir Gintoff for ASX, October 2013 History often reveals itself in unexpected places. Take Salt, Mark Kurlansky’s non-fiction opus on how a […]

Christine Osinski – “From Staten Island”

    Christine Osinski moved to Staten Island, New York in the early 1980s and immediately felt at home. Osinski had grown up on the South Side of Chicago and Staten Island had the same kind of muscular, working class sensibility she was accustomed to. Between 1983 and 1984 Osinski walked the borough with a […]

Brassai: “The Language of the Wall”

Best known for his photographs of nocturnal Paris and its demimonde, Brassai also took pictures of wall carvings and markings over three decades. Published in 1961 in the collection Graffiti, the prints were divided into sections, including painted graffiti, which Brassai titled The Language of the Wall. Brassai was interested in how the images eventually […]

HenryK: “My Kind of Town”

Henryk was a former employee of the ACME and UPI News Service Office located in Chicago Tribune Towers. Henryk covered many events in Chicago and beyond during his days as an ace photographer for the news service.

In the Face of All Odds: Dorothea Lange’s Psychological Studies of the Depression’s Disenfranchised (1986)

By Merrill Schleier. Presented at Southwest Labor Studies Conference, March 14, 1986 Dorothea Lange’s images of the Depression’s unemployed and disenfranchised victims have long been acknowledged both for their power to prompt government action and their compassion. Lange was one of several photographers employed by the Resettlement Administration, which was later subsumed under the Farm […]

America’s Race Riots of the Sixties

In the early 1960s, African Americans in cities nationwide were growing frustrated with the high level of poverty in their communities. Since the years immediately following World War II (1939–45), middle-class white Americans had been leaving the cities for nearby suburbs. Businesses that had once provided jobs and tax funding in the cities were leaving […]