Thoughts on Manuel Álvarez Bravo’s Color Work

  “Sunlight arms color photographs with daisies and when it refutes initiation, it instead lends pestilence to limbs that once lovingly embraced the nectar of its floral inhabitants”   Color is a very sensitive pursuit. It curries favor with no artist. It has an understanding about it that exceeds what appears outright as a seasonal […]

Piotr Zbierski: Echoes Shades The Ethnography of Shadows

“Are classifications necessary? What are there limits? Who can photograph who and what? “   I am always curious by what we consider the exotic in photographs. I often find myself thinking of the vestigial media forms of the past- all the inconsistencies, problematic discourses, and general selling of anything “other” in photographs, magazines and […]

Gordon Parks: The Atmosphere of Crime, 1957/2020

  “It would be easy for me to say that this book is published at the right moment and that it correlates a simple reminder about the inhuman conditions of the past…”   It is June 9th, 2020 and as I sit here penning this “review” of Gordon Parks perhaps sadly non-anachronistic and oddly prescient […]

Dieter Keller: Das Auge Des Krieges

“Othering of the loser of a war is important for collective consciousness and acts as a bulwark against the tide of human sympathy in the matters of inhumane consequence”   There are a number of different ways to approach writing about photography and World War II and to be clear, none of them should consider […]

Lewis Baltz on Ed van der Elsken, Edward Weston and Wright Morris (2009)

“One photographer that impressed me enormously – but it wasn’t my kind of thing at all; I didn’t really do it, but I thought it was brilliant. And also use of text. Both actually – both used text and image. It was Ed van der Elsken.”   Excerpt from a tape-recorded interview with Lewis Baltz […]

Australian Murder Victims (1910-1960)

Excerpts from the forensic photography archive at the Justice & Police Museum in Sydney, Australia which contains an estimated 130,000 negatives created by the New South Wales Police between 1910 and 1960.

Geronimo, Sitting Bull and other Native American Cabinet Cards

First introduced in the 1860s, cabinet card photographs were similar to cartes-de-visite, only larger. Measuring approximately four inches by six inches and mounted on cardstock (similar to cardboard), cabinet card photos got their name from their size—they were just the right size to be displayed on a cabinet. Cabinet cards reached their peak of popularity […]