Sybren Vanoverberghe’s 1099: A Violent Compression

“The world itself defines humanity by an unceasing and unrelenting violence”   Sybren Vanoverberghe‘s 1099: A Violent Compression Art Paper Editions. Text: Brad Feuerhelm The world itself defines humanity by an unceasing and unrelenting violence. This violence can be seen in the material record of geology, but also in historical ruin. The violence that oversees […]

Peter Mitchell: Early Sunday Morning, Signs & Reasons

  “I have assumed this focus on the found vernacular to be American in nature. However, the details of national ownership is missing apart from the rise of American modernism or the focus on its anti-thesis, namely quaint small town America advertising often hand painted and rough”   It is somehow impossible not to mention […]

Piotr Zbierski: Echoes Shades The Ethnography of Shadows

“Are classifications necessary? What are there limits? Who can photograph who and what? “   I am always curious by what we consider the exotic in photographs. I often find myself thinking of the vestigial media forms of the past- all the inconsistencies, problematic discourses, and general selling of anything “other” in photographs, magazines and […]

Samuel Fosso Autoportrait SIX SIX SIX

"Our point of view of the self is hidden and although personal subjectivity is widely considered to be the foundation of image-making at present, we have deluded ourselves for a great number of years suggesting that photography could ever be anything more than the self exposed through images of the exterior."   The greatest gift [...]

Arnaud Montagard: The Road, The Diner and the Drink on the Table

  “In the case of Arnaud Montagard’s The Road Not Taken, the lens is focused on the remnants of a mid-century American dream as exemplified by gas stations and diners that bear all the vernacular hallmarks of the Atomic Age”     The best way to describe human activity in a photograph is to remove […]

A Texture Akin to Language: Alan Huck Revisits Michael Schmidt’s Waffenruhe

  “The fridge was loud, but outside it was quiet, much quieter.”     There is a literal wall of language separating the two halves of Michael Schmidt’s landmark photobook Waffenruhe (published in 1987 and reprinted in 2018), a visually sprawling text that spans seventeen pages at the center of the book. Despite the text’s […]

Gordon Parks: The Atmosphere of Crime, 1957/2020

  “It would be easy for me to say that this book is published at the right moment and that it correlates a simple reminder about the inhuman conditions of the past…”   It is June 9th, 2020 and as I sit here penning this “review” of Gordon Parks perhaps sadly non-anachronistic and oddly prescient […]

Thomas Sauvin: In Opposition, The Mirror Lies

  We confuse ourselves with our recognition of our portrait in a mirror. The hand that brushes away the hairs from the forehead, the sweet sticky perspiration that pins the lock to the crown is read in reverse and yet, this reversal is apathetic to the self that it stares back at. The eyes glare […]

Helga Paris: Leipzig Hauptbanhof 1981/82

“I exhibit a strange tendency in airports to curse, eyeball other people with malice and regard the general process of shuttling and hefting my mass through antiseptic tunnels and bizarre space age flat Jetson walklavators with contempt…”   A commonality between train stations and photography is the architecture of waiting. Waiting can be read in […]

Dieter Keller: Das Auge Des Krieges

“Othering of the loser of a war is important for collective consciousness and acts as a bulwark against the tide of human sympathy in the matters of inhumane consequence”   There are a number of different ways to approach writing about photography and World War II and to be clear, none of them should consider […]

Americans Parade – an interview with George Georgiou

“Every image poses the question of American identity not just from the standpoint of our present reality, but from the playbook of iconic images – most of them from the twentieth century – that make up the history of American photography.”

Emilie Lauriola Le Bal, Paris: Support Photobook Shops #5

“This is before the Internet and I was living in an isolated place, so access to ‘culture’ was quite limited but I fortunately did have the photography magazines my parents were buying as well as the radio shows I would try to tune into from the countryside to copy the music on tapes…”   BF: […]