Bill Brandt: A Statement on Photography (1948)

“I am not interested in rules and conventions … photography is not a sport. If I think a picture will look better brilliantly lit, I use lights, or even flash.”   By Bill Brandt, First published in Camera in London, 1948 I had the good fortune to start my career in Paris in 1929. For […]

Richard Avedon – ‘Jacob Israel Avedon’ (1974)

Jacob Israel Avedon, father of Richard Avedon, Sarasota, Florida, 1969-1973 We all perform. It’s what we do for each other all the time, deliberately or unintentionally.   By Richard Avedon, July 14, 1974, New York City, Originally Published in Camera Magazine, November, 1974 A photographic portrait is a picture of someone who knows he’s being photographed, […]

Roger Ballen – ‘Shadow Chamber’ (2007)

Twirling Wires, 2001   This demonstrates in a fresh and very personal way photography’s intrinsic ability to lead beyond our usual conception of reality without resorting to visual exaggeration.   Roger Ballen’s Shadow Chamber By Robert Fleck, Originally Published, Eikon Issue 57 – March 2007 Seeing Roger Ballen’s extensive portfolio Shadow Chamber – made over […]

Ralph Eugene Meatyard, 1925 – 1972

While he lived Meatyard’s work was shown and collected by major museums, published in important art magazines, and regarded by his peers as among the most original and disturbing imagery ever created with a camera. By James Rhem, 1999 Ralph Eugene Meatyard’s death in 1972, a week away from his 47th birthday, came at the […]

The Indecisive Moment: Frank, Klein, and ‘Stream-Of-Consciousness’ Photography (2004)

 Half the time the photographers seemed not to have even looked through the camera. Far from seeking the perfect composition, the ‘decisive moment’, their work seemed curiously unfinished. It captured ‘indecisive’ rather than decisive moments.   By Gerry Badger “Frank… and Klein brought to the decade a feeling for its woes which, in retrospect, synthesizes […]

Paul Graham – ‘The Unreasonable Apple’ (2010)

“Perhaps here we have stumbled upon a partial, but nonetheless astonishing description of the creative act at the heart of serious photography: nothing less than the measuring and folding of the cloth of time itself.” By Paul Graham This month I read a review in a leading US Art Magazine of a Jeff Wall survey […]

Lee Friedlander: “Just Look At It” (2005)

By Rod Slemmons Lee Friedlander was born in the logging mill town of Aberdeen, Washington in 1934. He began photographing in 1948 because of a “fascination with the equipment,” in his words. His first paid job was a Christmas card photograph of a dog for a local madam named Peggy Plus. He later attended the […]

A Visit with Diane Arbus, One Month Before Her Death

Then she appeared at the door, and compared with my image of her, she might almost have been her own daughter.   A Visit with Diane Arbus – On a Hot Summer Day in New York, One Month Before Her Death By Allan Porter On a hot, muggy afternoon in New York, I took a […]

Czeslaw Milosz on Josef Koudelka’s Exiles

Hauts-de-Seine, Parc de Sceaux, France, 1987. Czeslaw Milosz on Josef Koudelka’s “Exiles” While writing this essay I had before my eyes Josef Koudelka’s photographs. Let my words serve as a tribute to his art of telling stories without words. Rhythm is at the core of human life. It is, first of all, the rhythm of […]