David Moore: “Pictures from the Real World” (2013)

David Moore: Colour Photographs 1987-­88 Pictures From The Real World Essay by David Chandler If the chemically charged 1960s brought new constellations of colour to the drab austerity of post‐war Britain, then British documentary photography remained that period’s more sober shadow: resolutely black and white and firmly rooted in a past, it was the serious, […]

In the Face of All Odds: Dorothea Lange’s Psychological Studies of the Depression’s Disenfranchised (1986)

By Merrill Schleier. Presented at Southwest Labor Studies Conference, March 14, 1986 Dorothea Lange’s images of the Depression’s unemployed and disenfranchised victims have long been acknowledged both for their power to prompt government action and their compassion. Lange was one of several photographers employed by the Resettlement Administration, which was later subsumed under the Farm […]

Weegee: Portrait of the Artist as a Paparazzo (2006)

He was so respected by the NYPD that they let him fit a police radio in his car, but even with that edge, his uncanny ability to show up at a crime scene before the police even knew about the crime gave him his nickname. Weegee was so fast that he must be getting tip-offs […]

Lee Friedlander: “An Exemplary Modern Photographer (excerpt)” (1975)

  Friedlander’s work provides some of the first and best examples of what has become a widespread approach to photography. It was part of the general reorientation of the sixties within American art. Within photography his work violated the dominant formal canons not by inattention but by systemic negation.   By Martha Rosler, excerpt from […]

ralph eugene meatyard

Ralph Eugene Meatyard: Learning to See ‘No-Focus’ (2011)

Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925-1972) spent three months looking through an unfocused camera in order to “learn to see No-Focus.” By Rebekah Modrak, Bill Anthes, excerpt from Reframing Photography: Theory and Practice, 2011 Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925-1972) spent three months looking through an unfocused camera in order to “learn to see No-Focus.” Working roughly 30 years […]

Jeongmee Yoon: Zoo (1998-1999)

Gorilla, 1998-1999   Rather strange and even surreal images of the zoo give us a chill: Gazing into it for a moment, you might find it reminiscent of an empty stage or a cell in jail.   By Young-Taek Park JeongMee Yoon’s black and white photos have our gazes wandering somewhere in-between animals and their […]

Diane Arbus: “Essential Mysteries (Excerpt)” (2011)

One of Arbus’s last series of photographs was of the institutionalized mentally retarded, whom she found “the strangest combination of grownup and child” she’d ever seen.   By William Todd Schultz, excerpt from An Emergency in Slow Motion: The Inner Life of Diane Arbus, 2011 Essential Mysteries One of photographer Diane Arbus’s first pictures, she […]

Eggleston’s World (1999)

“I think of them as parts of a novel I’m doing.”   By Walter Hopps, essay from The Hasselblad Award, 1998 These were the first words William Eggleston uttered when I asked what he felt he was accomplishing with his photographs. Another fine photographer from the South, William Christenberry, had brought Eggleston to meet me […]

I Make My Picture on the Surface: Visiting Thomas Ruff in Dusseldorf (2005)

Sammlung Goetz, Munchen, 1994 Ruff’s work is based on a critical study of the nature and history of photography. To his mind, the reputed objectivity of photography has always been suspect, and electronic processing is no less manipulative than the subjective selection made by the person looking through the lens. By Philip Ursprung, text excerpt […]

Max Kozloff On Lisette Model (and Weegee) (2002)

@ Lisette Model Estate   Model’s art is definitely antibourgeois: her judgments indict the middle class’s smugness as well as its selfishness.   By Max Kozloff, Excerpt from New York: Capital of Photography, 2002 Model’s art is definitely antibourgeois: her judgments indict the middle class’s smugness as well as its selfishness. For example, she depicted […]

On Diane Arbus vs Eugene Smith (1977)

By Robert Coles, Wellesley College, 1977 I have an intense dislike for Diane Arbus. I don’t like her photographs and I don’t like the cult that’s been made of them. Maybe it’s because I’m a psychiatrist, because some part of me feels that that’s wrong, that that isn’t the whole of the reality. Or maybe […]

Notes from the Margin of Spoiled Identity – The Art of Diane Arbus (1988)

“I always thought of photography as a naughty thing to do, that was one of my favorite things about it, and when I first did it, I felt very perverse.” – Diane Arbus   By Gerry Badger as a collaboration with ASX, Originally Published in Phototexts, 1988 The principal issue raised by the remarkable photographs […]