Deanna Dikeman Relative Moments

  Everything in this book reminds me of my upbringing in the Midwest. It feels so painfully familiar. When I mention pain in my assessment, it is because some of this experience gnaws at me and upends the chapters of my life that I have found hard to celebrate or close. I am woefully disobedient […]

JM Ramirez-Suassi – Malparaíso

    There has been a much-needed turn away from the constraints of documentary photography over the past couple of years in favor of something less direct and more lyrical. I can think of several fantastic artists working away from the documentary with a tendency toward erasing its constrictive need for relational dialog. Federico Clavarino, […]

Interview with Sharr White

Photographer Larry Sultan’s iconic photobook Pictures from Home, initially published in 1992, found renewed acclaim with its 2017 re-release by MACK. Sultan’s intimate exploration of familial bonds captured the attention of audiences worldwide, culminating in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1989. The impact of Sultan’s photographic series resonated […]

Mikael Siirilä – Here, in Absence

  Mikael Siirilä’s Here, in Absence, published by IIKKI in an edition of 500 copies with a soundtrack, is one of 2024’s finest photobook offerings thus far. It was lodged between the somnambulist type of photography previously found in Ralph Gibson and Duane Michal’s dream-state work. The book explores singular images in monochrome that have […]

Joel Pulliam on Ikko Narahara

Ikko Narahara – Where Time has Vanished by Joel Pulliam It has been on my mind for a while to write about something that I am provisionally calling “New Orientalism.” It is the phenomenon of highly regarded photographers dropping into Tokyo for a few weeks or months, taking pictures, and then publishing a book. I […]

Thana Faroq – How Shall We Greet the Sun

  I am quite taken with the text in Thana’s excellent new book, How Shall We Greet the Sun, published, like her last book, I Don’t Recognize Me in the Shadows, by Lecturis. I am uncertain exactly how she is engaging with the concepts of sentimentality and nostalgia, being that she seems to be using […]

Nikita Teryoshin – Nothing Personal: The Back Office of War

War is good business for some, and misery for most everyone else. The executives of defense contractors such as Lockheed Martin or Raytheon, people who directly profit from the outbreak and continuation of war, are incentivized to hope for its continuation rather than its cessation, because where there is war (in Yemen, Ukraine, or in […]

Inuuteq Storch – Necromancer

  I must admit that I am kind of shocked seeing Storch’s work in grainy, dissolved Anders Petersen/Yutaka Takanashi-esque monochrome. Having been a massive fan of his lushly saturated Keepers of the Ocean book in color, published by Disko Bay Books just a few years ago, I feel quite different about this despite the similar […]

Henriette Sabroe Ebbesen – Self Reflection

Henriette Sabroe Ebbesen’s new book Self Reflection, published by Danish young heavyweight Disko Bay, is a fascinating foray into the psychic territory of mirror play, in which bodies double, dissolve, and align with the subconscious. It would be easy to call the work psychedelic, but that precludes pre-existing conditions, which, like Surrealism, are contained in […]

Raymond Meeks & George Weld – The Inhabitants

  Putting my thoughts on this book together has taken me a while. Most of this comes down to trying to understand how I feel about the subject or lack of subject within the work and the position of the author(s) to that. I often have a knee-jerk reaction when it comes to people photographing […]

Trent Parke – Monument

  Ruptures and Raptures   It is hard to know where to start writing about a book with such ominous tendencies at its heart. Monuments by Trent Parke, published by Stanley/Barker in 2023 and its third printing in spring 2024, has a doomsday proximity to it. It is hard to explain why I feel this […]

Ros Boisier – Inside

    “Of what one cannot speak, whereof one must be silent.” L.W.   Sure, it’s slightly glib to usher in a review with Wittgenstein’s oft-quoted (often misaligned, here too) citation regarding meaning and language. It will surely make scholars of the philosopher’s work uncomfortable/annoyed. Yet, I frequently think of this quote for my purposes […]