William Eggleston – “TateShots” (2014)

Known for his rich and complex images of the American South, William Eggleston is the godfather of colour photography. Though his images record a particular place at a certain point in time, Eggleston is not interested in their documentary qualities. Instead, when asked what he is photographing, Eggleston simply answers ‘Life today’. Curator Simon Baker […]

Larry Clark’s Memory

Memory is largely based on lived experience. We remember important events that mark the passage of time, and as we get further away from those events our memories may be distorted; we lose details and make additions along the way. By Megan Bradley, first published  in Volume 3 of the Concordia Undergraduate Journal of Art History […]

Notes on Five Key Jean-Michel Basquiat Works

Untitled (Head), 1981 His paintings proclaimed the existence of a more basic truth locked within a given event or thought. The Defining Years: Notes on Five Key Works By Fred Hoffman The idea that the soul will join with the ecstatic Just because the body is rotten— That is all fantasy. What is found now […]

Richard Avedon On the Truths and the Lies of Photography (1984)

“There is no truth in photography. There is no truth about anyone’s person.” – Richard Avedon   Excerpt from Richard Avedon interview in Egoiste, September 1984 Nicole Wisniak: Do you think a photographer is a person obsessed by the fact that things disappear? Richard Avedon: I can’t generalize. All the remains of my father is a […]

Jean-Michel Basquiat and “The Art of (Dis)Empowerment” (2000)

He was also known to be reluctant to involve himself in black politics, often finding himself estranged from “up town” black artist communities. By Louis Armand,  from a lecture at the Comparative Studies Colloquium, August 30, 2000, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. When Jean-Michel Basquiat died in 1988 at the age of twenty-seven he had only been […]

Robert Frank: “Unpleasant Connections” (1991)

“In Butte, Montana, he photographed a slovenly, middle-aged woman in her car with a sullen child staring out of the window behind her. He showed a bench full of decrepit old people in St. Petersburg, Florida, staring at nothing in particular while a shiny new Pontiac whizzed by on the street behind them.”   By […]

Brassai – ‘The Surrealist Observer’ (Excerpt) (1998)

Brassai always insisted that none of his photographs was posed…   By Marja Warehime, excerpt from Brassai: Images of Culture and the Surrealist Observer Brassai always insisted that none of his photographs was posed, and there is no reason to believe that he behaved differently with the toughs in the rue de Lappe then he […]

On Ralph Eugene Meatyard (Excerpt) (1997)

  Williams wrote me that there was a photographer there who took pictures of children and American flags in attics.   Excerpt from The Geography of the Imagination: Forty Essays By Guy Davenport When I moved to Lexington in 1964 the poet Jonathan Williams wrote me that there was a photographer there who took pictures […]

Stephen Shore – ‘Behind the Mythology’ (2013)

Stephen Shore is truly the photographers’ photographer. For over forty years, he has contributed his gift to the creative world through books, exhibitions and professorship. In this short documentary interview, Imagista’s director Heidi Hartwig dispels the mystery of the man behind the mythology.     EXPLORE ALL STEPHEN SHORE ON ASX

William Eggleston – “The Colorful Mr. Eggleston” (2009)

William Eggleston is one of the most influential and original photographers alive today. A Mississippi aristocrat with a fondness for guns, drink and women, he dragged colour into the world of art photography. Reviled in the 1970s, he is now considered a legend whose unique visual style has influenced generations of photographers and filmmakers. Imagine […]

Diane Arbus – Flirt, Flash & Mirror (2013)

Diane Arbus at “Love-In,” Central Park, New York 1969 @ The Estate of Garry Winogrand   Arbus hunts out forms that can be judged as impure, hidden from the view of everyday onlookers. Whilst transsexuals, tattoos and prostitutes are now very much part of the “Official Institution of the Conventional Archetype of the Bizarre”, there […]

Brassai: “The Language of the Wall”

Best known for his photographs of nocturnal Paris and its demimonde, Brassai also took pictures of wall carvings and markings over three decades. Published in 1961 in the collection Graffiti, the prints were divided into sections, including painted graffiti, which Brassai titled The Language of the Wall. Brassai was interested in how the images eventually […]