Max Sher Palimpsests

  Though change is metered through the concept of progress in urban space, oftentimes there is an arrestation of form as its transitions from one set of facades to its new progressive and updated counterpart. This arrestation sees the hybridity of new and old caught in a transitional moment in which both are vying for […]

Jo Ractliffe: Under a State of Emergency

“Ractliffe’s work, whether consciously or not, emerges at a time when the impossibility of representing experience started to gain purchase in discussions around the medium’s shortfalls.”

Stephen Shore Steel Town

    Glancing at Steel Town by Stephen Shore (MACK, 2021) gives the reader the impression that what they are looking at has a point of fixity in the past. The images, produced in 1977 for Fortune Magazine, and have a quality that suggests a bygone era. Whether it is the kitsch interior of Eddie’s […]

Keld Helmer-Petersen Photographs 1941-2013

Keld Helmer-Petersen is predominantly associated with the early use of color photography as an art form. His book 122 Color Photographs self-published in 1948 is considered a pioneering photobook for its use of color though it makes up a very marginal amount of the artist’s entire body of work.     Keld Helmer-Petersen’s concerns in […]

Alexander Rosenkranz: CITY CUT OFF

One can think of the urban environment in its various stages of building and tearing down as an interlocking mechanism similar to a pocket watch or Rubik’s cube. Each part of the city, its buildings, its billboards, and its many pieces interlock to provide traction for the cogs of the watch to continue its movements. […]

Massimiliano Tommaso Rezza PSALM

I think of Massimiliano Tommaso Rezza’s process as being a dislocated type of photographic practice. His work functions on the viewer being able to unlock parts of his cryptic use of images, but never all. One is asked to recognize inherent photographic themes and usages, but it is very difficult to place an exacting context […]

Gerry Johansson Esker

What looks benign or without consequence can be illusory. What lies below the surface can provide a catalog of answers.     The distant past as a concept is very hard to photograph. In thicket and open clearing, in water and desert, it is difficult to unlock the image of ancient history. We can only […]

Eiji Ohashi: Roadside Lights Seasons: Winter

Eiji Ohashi’s Roadside Lights Seasons: Winter is deceptively simple in its approach. The main theme of the book considers a constant in the Japanese landscape through the repeated photographic investigation of its roadside vending machines. Though beautifully photographed, the book details one type of subject matter across the beautiful backdrop of Japan at night. It […]

Jon Cazenave Galerna

I don’t know if I believe that photography can define a people or a nation adequately, so I surmise that its best course of action is to speak about these topics in metaphor as if an attempt at truth will not be tolerated by observers from a secondhand accounting. It seems as though a majority […]

A Conversation Between Robert Morat and Matteo Di Giovanni

RM: What is “home“ to you? Maybe also talk about where and how you grew up and where you feel your roots are. MDG: This is a question I’ve been asking myself many times in the last few years and – to be frank – I still don’t have a definitive answer. I’m more prone […]

Giles Price Restricted Residence Thermal Observations

  “To call Price’s book clever would be a disservice to himself and those involved. It is brave and brilliant in its assessment of the topic and should be valued for what it is not-a rush to exploit the sensitive undergirding of tragedy as featured in the work(s) of D’Agata and others”   I am […]

Rebecca Norris Webb Night Calls

In memory of a young woman that I never knew. This reflection is dedicated to Carol Jenkins-Davis     I find myself combatively trying to embed myself in the images, memories and families of others. My initial hesitancy in this pursuit comes from acknowledging the failure of such an enterprise. It comes from a point […]