inri: Symposion About Love 1996-2000

    The emphasis on performance or performing photography seems like a never-ending discussion. I have been looking backwards through the history of photography and can see without much difficulty that its Western beginnings are full of images that exemplify the tradition such as Hippolyte Bayard’s Self-Portrait as a Drowned Man from 1840 forward through […]

Giles Price Restricted Residence Thermal Observations

  “To call Price’s book clever would be a disservice to himself and those involved. It is brave and brilliant in its assessment of the topic and should be valued for what it is not-a rush to exploit the sensitive undergirding of tragedy as featured in the work(s) of D’Agata and others”   I am […]

Koji Kitagawa: Mapping the Technical in Dreams

Do robots dream of Black Phillip? Do artists dream in data? Does a spectre haunt the algorithm?     In a world in which we are reduced to bytes, blips, glitch and transmission, we begin to consider where the mapping of our reality in images begins. Our photographic lives are now dominated by the urgency […]

Seiichi Furuya & Christine Gössler Face To Face

  “We may consider these types of photographs as a glimpse, a grimace or a greeting between subject and viewer, nothing more”   It is hard to condense seven years of intimacy into the frames of 35mm negatives. You cannot easily graph the moments that pass between two orbiting worlds, the moments of affection, disagreements […]

Gerry Johansson- Ehime & Lalendorf und Klaber

    “it is strange for me to consider his efforts as Swedish and yet there is something to the examination of what can only be referred to as the National Camera, implicit in that sentiment are all of the complications of generalizations and archetypes. I am not trying to espouse something concrete, but rather […]

Support the Shops: Interview With Photo Book Corner Rui Ribeiral

BF: Photo Book Corner has just taken up new quarters, new premises in Lisbon. Is this the first shop that you have had for the Photo Book Corner? Can you perhaps give us a little insight into when you started working with books? Did you come through photography or was this started from the book […]

Mayumi Hosokura’s New Skin

  “This ‘gendering’ includes everything from one’s awareness of their own individual body, to global political and social issues (the feminine pose, the masculine blue colour, the ‘masculinity’ of war)”     Mayumi Hosokura’s New Skin begins with a single quote on its inside cover. It is a quote by Donna Haraway, from her 1988 […]

2019: A Short Guide To White People & Their Photography Books

It was the best of years….   Once again it is that time of year where I try to drum up some sort of edit from all of the incredible work the photography book world offers up. This year is difficult as I felt it has been one of the strongest years in recent memory […]

Guillaume Simoneau: Murder as Legacy

“Guillaume Simoneau is a not a cannibal, but his book Murder (MACK), is an ode to Fukase’s legendary status and particularly his book Karasu/Ravens. Murder is a devotional hymn, or a phantom limb added to the mythology of the Japanese artist”     Inherent or Mythological Propagandas   One of photography’s less considered functions is […]

Martin Stöbich: Beirut / Tokyo 東京 and one picture of Mt. Fuji / Happy in the U.A.E.

“The way a photographer “sees” and commits to an image is through experience. These experiences have very little to do with the camera and are built up over years of living-these experiences and the years that sponsor them are not always the glorious nostalgic highlights that we remember in their honey-dipped form, but are also formed of tragedy, comedy and a resistance to our inside force of direction”.

Masahisa Fukase: Family Enshrined

  “Times change, we orchestrate ourselves to different locations and yet with nostalgia nothing need be lost. It can be found again. We can consider the death of an idea as being flexible to finality, but that is a different conversation”.     We tend to enshrine people and ideas with a certain sense of […]

Lena C. Emery: Yuka & The Indeterminate Forest

    “When I consider Japanese forests, I am always distracted by Aokigahara and in doing so, I have to place our protagonist there amongst the Durkheimian realities that it ensues”.   It somehow seems pertinent to have left this title too long to review having been caught in the deluge of books landing on […]