Ros Boisier Inside

    “Of what one cannot speak, whereof one must be silent.” L.W.   Sure, it’s slightly glib to usher in a review with Wittgenstein’s oft-quoted (often misaligned, here too) citation regarding meaning and language. It will surely make scholars of the philosopher’s work uncomfortable/annoyed. Yet, I frequently think of this quote for my purposes […]

Toshio Shibata – Day For Night

  The work of Toshio Shibata is not easy to categorize by genre. The overriding and extended principle featured in the work is that of a type of industrial architectural photography. This is, in turn, echoed by a nod to ecological considerations of the landscape. The photographs feel monumental and isolated. People do not enter […]

Joachim Brohm LESSMORE Interview

  Joachim Brohm’s work has influenced my way of thinking about photography, particularly his work regarding architecture. Though Joachim might not say that his work is directly about architecture, how he photographs sites and buildings has been vital in opening my eyes to new possibilities for seeing potential subject matter. Known for several high-profile and […]

Henry Schulz – People Things

  The photographs in this series were taken between 2020-2022 in Germany. Taken in seemingly forgotten spaces that bear the traces of past human intervention. The places are in a state of transformation, which is slowly taking place. Sometimes, it is a seeming recapture of nature or a blurred state of abandonment. In photographically precisely […]

Interview with Dan Skjæveland on 33 Suspensions

Dan Skjæveland is a Norwegian artist living in Trondheim. He recently published his first monograph with Nearest Truth Editions. I spoke to Dan about his way into photography, his process and the making of his book 33 Suspensions. — ASX: Let’s talk about your beginnings. How did you come to photography? Dan Skjæveland: I came to photography […]

Anne Lass – Triple Seven

  Peppered throughout major cities, including Berlin, where the new photobook Triple Seven by Anne Lass was shot, are clandestine spaces that most of the population will never enter or see. Men’s clubs in North London, brothels in Marseilles, and small gambling rooms in Berlin, as Lass has photographed, are secreted behind a façade of […]

Andrea Alessandrini – I Am Not A Robot

I Am Not A Robot (Witty Books, 2023) asks more questions than it answers. How do we differentiate from the illusions of our constructed virtual worlds and that of reality? How do we satiate our requirement and desire for order in ever-changing environments? Are we confined to an existence based on binary calculations, or can […]

Bertien van Manen – Gluckauf

Coal mining is a very peculiar enterprise. The 19th and 20th Centuries committed untold heaves of labor to its extraction. It fuels communities, yet its extraction suggests a disemboweling of the land where these communities settle. The prospect of coal mining is one of capital and capitalism. The very human clay that mines these enterprises […]

Laurenz Berges – Das Becherhaus in Mudersbach

  Full Article on Patreon     …Further images within images add to the sense of a lived space as Becher family photos from the 20s and 30s adorn mantels and countertops, with a finesse of an image, ala the Bechers, of a water town, sat, out of frame, lithely resting against a presumed wedding […]

Ursula Schulz-Dornburg Huts, Temples, Castles

  “He capered toward Bill, and the mask was a thing on its own, behind which Jack hid, liberated from shame and self-consciousness.” William Golding, Lord of the Flies   “In Huts, Temples, Castles, MACK returns with a new book from Ursula Schulz-Dornburg. As is the distinct emphasis on architecture and vernacular sensibility, all typological […]

The Cracks on the Floor: Sebastián Mejía’s “Tempo”

“We often expect high-end production values in contemporary photobooks, but not every publication can afford some of the eccentricities that we have become accustomed to. In this sense, Tempo reminds us that our material expectations shouldn’t dismiss publications that use humble materials, often produced outside the usual centers of culture and power.”

The Opaqueness of Manifest Destiny: Daniel Reuter’s Providencia

Let’s start at the end with the text that closes Providencia by the Chilean Alejandro Zambra. The author, who lives in Mexico City, felt the urge to visit his country after days of increasingly violent protests against the government due to economic inequality. The unrest eventually led to a curfew and the declaration of a state of […]