Vaguely Stealthy Creatures: Max Kozloff on the Poetics of Street Photography (2002)

Image @ Joel Meyerowitz “Vaguely Stealthy Creatures”: Max Kozloff on the Poetics of Street Photography By Martin Patrick, Afterimage, December 22, 2002 The critic Max Kozloff frequently reminds his readers of the inherent instability of meaning within the photographic medium. In an early essay (from 1964) he considers “the aesthetic situation in photography to be […]

William Eggleston: ‘Draft of a Presentation’ (2003)

It’s hard for me to describe the fascination that William Eggleston’s photographs exert on me.   William Eggleston: Draft of a Presentation By Thomas Weski It’s hard for me to describe the fascination that William Eggleston’s photographs exert on me. More than twenty years ago, I bought William Eggleston’s Guide, the catalogue of his solo […]

An Interview with Lewis Baltz

“I don’t think we need that at all, any more; we already know, to the point of ennui, what the world looks like in photographs.”   Interview with Lewis Baltz: Jean-Pierre Greff and Elisabeth Milon The photographer Lewis Baltz, originally from California, has spent the past thirty years, mainly in urban and suburban surroundings, bringing […]

An Interview with Garry Winogrand (1981)

 Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1957   “I think that those kind of distinctions and lists of titles like “street photographer” are so stupid.”   From Visions and Images: American Photographers on Photography, Interviews with photographers by Barbara Diamonstein, 1981–1982, Rizoli: New York Garry Winogrand is one of the most important photographers at work in America today. His […]

Mark van den Brink The Minox Files

  The Minox pocket camera was developed in 1936 by Walter Zapp to provide the public with a small compact camera that was easily portable and that was economically feasible for a budding amateur class of photographers to purchase. Its innovative design, compact, small, and easily hidden were later co-opted as something of a novel […]

Aaron Schuman: Slant Interview

“Reading through them, I realised that the best ones seemed to create a kind of mental-image in my mind’s eye – which due to the tone of the text often took the form of a very deadpan, monotone, and even monochrome photograph of a little scene in small-town America; I was imagining a very straightforward picture made by Walker Evans or Lee Friedlander or Diane Arbus or others, of four dogs sitting on top of a car, or a guy standing next to a tree in the middle of the afternoon with bloody knuckles…”